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asal

Gee, bad news for america.

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asal   

53256823_10156993100112243_8957915316768

 

and now a dog from Korea has brought in an untreatable distemper, putting our North American dogs at risk because there is no shot to protect our dogs.

 

 

 

 

This is a plane stacked to the roof of rescue dogs being flown into Lancaster last year to a Megadoption event in Philadelphia. If a breeder packed dogs in a plane like this, the pict would be posted on every major news fb page. Wonder how the water in the dixie cups zip tied to the crates lasted during a long flight?

 

53098645_10213321506652216_3818767087728

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26 minutes ago, asal said:

This is a plane stacked to the roof of rescue dogs being flown into Lancaster last year to a Megadoption event in Philadelphia. If a breeder packed dogs in a plane like this, the pict would be posted on every major news fb page. Wonder how the water in the dixie cups zip tied to the crates lasted during a long flight?

 

53098645_10213321506652216_3818767087728

:eek: This is not ok I don't care if it's rescue or not. All I see is discomfort and stress and potential for contagious disease. 

No idea what the rescue situation is in America TBH but that transport is disgusting and should be banned.

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asal   

apparently america has shut down so many "backyard" breeders they are importing hundreds of thousands of dogs to stock their "rescues"..

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Snook   

The second photo has nothing to do with importing rescue dogs and they are dogs being flown in from shelters in Arizona, if you look at the article the image was taken from. Nothing makes transporting dogs like that even remotely okay but I can't find anything that says they were imported from overseas. 

https://lancasteronline.com/news/local/dogs-cats-available-at-mega-adoption-event-this-weekend-in/article_a40818cc-6448-11e8-8430-eb68fd0917cb.html

 

 

 

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8 hours ago, asal said:

apparently america has shut down so many "backyard" breeders they are importing hundreds of thousands of dogs to stock their "rescues"..

There is a surplus of homeless dogs in the South and a deficit in the NE and West coast.  Dogs are also brought in from Mexico, and sometimes further abroad (eg, Frenchies, at high prices, from Eastern Europe and dogs meant for eating, with much publicity, from Korea). Restrictions on backyard breeding are highly variable, but in general far fewer than in Oz. Subsidized spay/neuter programs are widespread. 

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Dogs & Lancaster County bring to mind the ongoing fight between rescuers and Amish puppy mills. The newspaper appears to be on the side of the Amish.

 

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I have a friend in the US whose sister fosters dogs. They are in Washington and her fosters are often large breed dogs 'saved' from poorer European areas. I just saw it as them providing a rescue service to areas that had none. All it takes is someone with connections in a European city. I know the same happens with the UK because of how freely the English travel throughout Europe. Quarantine laws are also very different.

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asal   

does she know if the bit about " an untreatable distemper, from an

 imported Koren dog"  is true?

 

We are so lucky in australia distemper is almost extinct now, terrible to see, even when some survive so many are are so damaged

Edited by asal

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Snook   

"You try to do the right thing.

 

In this case, the right thing was an animal-rescue group saving dogs from a Korean meat market and shipping them to North America last October so they could be adopted out to forever homes.

 

Only one of the dogs turned out to be something of a forever home himself: He was likely acting as host to the Asia-1 strain of canine distemper virus (CDV), which had not previously been reported in North America.

The sick dog developed a cough and began acting lethargically about two weeks after his arrival. Ten days after that, he developed muscle twitches, then seizures.

 

After the dog was euthanized, Cornell University’s Animal Health Diagnostic Center (AHDC) tested samples from dog. An initial suspicion of dog flu proved false when the samples tested negative for canine influenza, but positive for CDV, and nearly identical to the Asia-1 strain of CDV currently active in East Asia.

 

Scientists at AHDC identified the virus and say it likely poses little threat to US dogs, depending on their immunization status.

 

“It is my belief that dogs who are currently immunized for CDV should be OK if challenged with the Asia-1 strain,” Edward Dubovi, PhD, professor of population medicine and diagnostic sciences at Cornell and director of the virology laboratory at the AHDC, told NEWStat. “The emphasis here is ‘immunized,’ which is not the same as vaccinated. Reports that ‘vaccinated’ dogs have clinical distemper are not really valid unless their immune status was previously known, which is never the case.”

 

Although the Asia-1 strain may pose little threat to the companion animal population, the AHDC also warns that it could take a serious toll on wild carnivore populations should it come into contact with wildlife.

 

“Well-meaning people are trying to save animals, but when you move animals, you move their infectious disease,” said Dubovi. “If this particular Asia-1 strain got out into the wildlife population, then it’s here forever, because you can’t get rid of it once it hits wildlife.”

 

“Thousands of cases of distemper occur each year in wildlife such as raccoons, skunks, coyotes, and foxes,” Dubovi added. “Domestic dog distemper cases are not rare, particularly in shelter operations in the South and Southwest, where vaccination rates are very low.”

 

CDV has also been found in wolves and ferrets and has been reported in lions, tigers, leopards, other wild cats, and even in seals.

 

CDV is highly contagious and commonly travels between hosts through the aerosols emitted when dogs bark and cough and through urine and feces. The disease starts with respiratory symptoms, such as coughing and pneumonia, and progresses into gastrointestinal illness and neurological problems.

 

Most dogs in the United States receive vaccines for CDV to protect against native North American strains.

“For a dog presenting with CDV signs, there is not much that can be done other than monitor the course of the disease,” Dubovi said. Treatment of CDV typically consists of supportive care and efforts to prevent secondary infections; control diarrhea, vomiting, and neurologic symptoms; and administration of fluids to reverse dehydration. “Should the animal become neurological, then he might need to be [euthanized].”

 

Dubovi recommended that hospital staff collect information on the travel history of any dog who presents with CDV signs, and also information on where they’ve recently lived. “If from a shelter, the facility should be contacted to alert the staff as to the need for a change in their vaccination program,” Dubovi added.

 

CDV is a particular problem in shelters, where dogs infected with must be separated from other dogs to minimize the risk of further infection."

 

http://www.aaha.org/blog/NewStat/post/2019/04/01/005985/New-strain-of-distemper-virus-breaches-North-American-borders.aspx

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tdierikx   
3 hours ago, asal said:

We are so lucky in australia distemper is almost extinct now, terrible to see, even when some survive so many are are so damaged

It is definitely still here @asal... it's one of the diseases that kills wild foxes in decent numbers... we just don't see it as much in domestic dogs now is all. But there are still a number of cases reported in dogs every year...

 

T.

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Rebanne   

Distemper certainly is still here in Australia. It was one of the diseases one of my dogs was tested for recently.

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asal   

certainly haven't seen it in 60 years and hope to never see it again, my dad was considered quite weird, all his dogs were vaccinated, in those days his were the only ones in the street.

Edited by asal

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tdierikx   

There have actually been cases reported in Sydney relatively recently... mostly in the areas where there are low vaccination rates...

 

T.

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Maddy   
19 hours ago, Little Gifts said:

I have a friend in the US whose sister fosters dogs. They are in Washington and her fosters are often large breed dogs 'saved' from poorer European areas. I just saw it as them providing a rescue service to areas that had none. All it takes is someone with connections in a European city. I know the same happens with the UK because of how freely the English travel throughout Europe. Quarantine laws are also very different.

This. My aunt is currently living/working in Kazakhstan and the situation for street dogs there is terrible. Recently, she posted pictures of two stray dogs she'd been feeding, both dogs had newborn litters in a nearby culvert. Only a few days after birth, most of those poor babies are already dead. Any survivors will face a short, brutal life on the streets. If they are impounded, they may die immediately due to horrendous care conditions and if they survive that, no one wants to own mongrel dogs, and so they will be killed anyway. In some of these countries, things like humane societies simply don't exist. For the dogs who live there, there is no possibility of salvation. 

If those dogs can be helped by removing them to countries where they could be rehomed, provided the proper procedures are in place, why not? 

 

Below is a photo of "Mummy", one of the strays. My aunt and some local children have been caring for these dogs as best they can, there is simply no other help available. Despite being a stray, Mummy allows humans to handle her remaining puppy and would likely make a good companion for someone. But because of people like Asal, people who hate welfare groups so vigorously that they'll go as far as to attack rescue groups, dogs like Mummy will live and die on the streets.

 

Asal, I'm trying so hard to be tolerant of you and your issues, but this is not the first time you have purposely gone after rescue groups. You don't consider the harm you do to rescue (or to the animals they help) because you are selfishly obsessed with your own experience of the RSPCA. YOU had a bad experience, but that does not negate the immeasurable help some of these groups provide for animals.

58384724_10156963006045450_492021652314390528_n.jpg

Edited by Maddy
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Diva   

The problem for me is that proper quarantine and health procedures don’t seem to be in place for some of these mass international movements of dogs. Regulation and compliance, let alone ethics, don’t seem to be up to the risk. 

 

I don’t see the point of saving some if in doing that it causes massive risk for the resident dog population.  As much as my heart bleeds for the dogs in need the biosecurity risks are not diminished by their need. I have vet friends in the US who are very disturbed by the risks that are arising out of some of the shipments. 

 

Of course doing it safely is more expensive, which is why I prefer to support in-country rescue efforts where I can.

 

My breed has an international rescue arm and I contribute to them. But they are very careful around the contagious diseases issues. 

 

Apart from their own high ethics I am sure they know that their support from the breed community world wide would evaporate in a second if they were found to have been careless and put other dogs at risk. 

Edited by Diva
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Maddy   

I couldn't say whether or not proper vaccination/quarantine happens because I don't know the details for the groups involved. That said, given it is the law in the US that dogs be vaccinated at least for rabies, I have to assume certain requirements must be met on import? 

I don't see it as being much different to moving dogs around interstate within Australia- there is still the risk of undiagnosed/incubating disease, and perhaps even more so because there is virtually nothing in place for movement of dogs between states of Australia. The only real exception is Tasmania and hydatids, but even that can be lax, depending on how the dog enters the state. Distemper and parvo still exist here (distemper was diagnosed in the south of Tasmania earlier this year, from memory) and with some groups/people starting to drift away from the practice of  prophylactically worming/flea treating dogs (only treating when infestation is so severe that it is immediately obvious), disease and parasites will spread locally. Poor practices are poor practices, regardless of how far the animal is travelling. 

One case of distemper does not confirm overall poor practices, nor does one photo of improper transport. It's no different to the photos from Storybook, they were terrible but they weren't indicative of the care provided by the average rescue group. I'll reserve judgement of individual groups and their importation/transport practices until actual evidence is brought forward.

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4 hours ago, Diva said:

The problem for me is that proper quarantine and health procedures don’t seem to be in place for some of these mass international movements of dogs. Regulation and compliance, let alone ethics, don’t seem to be up to the risk. 

 

Of course doing it safely is more expensive, which is why I prefer to support in-country rescue efforts where I can.

 

 

The cost of thoroughly testing is huge and, at least in the US, no one lab is internationally certified to do all tests. You need international certification and verification, because where there's money to be made, people find ways to cheat. When I brought my 3 dogs from the US to NZ it came to several hundred dollars each in screening costs, plus a lot of hassles getting to vets at proper intervals, getting papers stamped, etc... and that didn't cover the Asian distemper strain.  I can't see any rescue doing all the required work... though a puppy mill breeding expensive breeds might be able to do it and still make a profit. 

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My feeling is if the transference of disease becomes a major issue for the US then the US will do something about it. But until then I don't see their average independant rescue groups being much different to ours - run on the smell of an oily rag by mostly volunteers, with the number of cats and dogs needing assistance outweighing the resources. If a couple have decided to take on out of country dogs it is because they have the network to do so, not because they have run out of dogs locally. Their social issues are more extreme than ours so you have poverty and homelessness on much larger levels that will be impacting why animals need rescue. If you got rid of puppy mills out here the whole rescue system wouldn't suddenly be devoid of dogs so I don't think it is radically different in America (or any other first world country for that matter) where puppy mill dogs are only a percentage of all the dogs who need saving.

 

But wouldn't it still be a brilliant day if they didn't exist and numbers circulating the rescue system were manageable!!!!

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Diva   

There was the canine influenza outbreak in the US a couple of years ago traced to Korean rescues as well as the current distemper case, and according to this Cornell article the only requirement for entry is a rabies certificate that is fairly easily forged in some countries. Dogs with rabies have been imported into the US. Bringing in dogs from different populations with vastly different disease incidence, possibly different viral strains, and vaccination status is a quite different level of biosecurity risk to moving them within the one country where populations mix all the time. The regulators in the US are as culpable as the rescues, I am so glad for this country’s strict requirements.

https://www.vet.cornell.edu/news/20190318/new-strain-canine-distemper-virus-arrives-north-america

Edited by Diva
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