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JacobScollies

Can anyone suggest a resource where I can view all the health test recommendations for each breed?

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I've been on the search for a pup for a while now - but I'd like to read more about suggested/recommended health testings on breeding dogs on my research. Is anyone aware of any pieces of information/resources you can recommend for a nice, educational read?

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sheena   

What breeds in particular??

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Dogsfevr   

Breeds testing varies ,info is easy to source .

Breeds clubs will list .

 

Keep in mind not all breeds have DNA testing available yet .

 

But if you say what breed people can’t point you in the right direction 

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I recently posted this to a Labrador site, but it applies to all breeds.  The point is not to skip testing, but to be sure to look at the whole dog. 

 

A PLEA REGARDING TESTING

I've retired from both uni teaching and Labrador breeding.  One insight from teaching side is that it's tempting to test for what is easy to test, as opposed to what is important.

In the case of health testing, big pharma tends to offer a suite of genetic indicators that are easy for laboratories to find, as opposed to those that are important for health.  Narcolepsy and centronuclear myopathy are so rare I've never seen or heard of them apart from genetic testing websites.  On the other hand, cancer kills more Labs than any other disease, diabetes, epilepsy, and allergies are far too common. Bloat is relatively uncommon, given that Labs are deep chested and notorious gutsers, and I hope that it remains uncommon.  Likewise, it would be great if geneticists could get a handle on the genetic components of osteoarthritis, dysplasia, etc., so we could better separate genetics from environment.

Temperament is a whole nother can of worms.  Here it's sufficient to say that it has a strong genetic component, and as an owner I'd rather have a dog that goes blind in late middle age than one that is absurdly anxious or aggressive throughout its life. 

Testing is needed to preserve quality.  But if we test only for the menu big pharma is offering, we may end up throwing the baby out with the bath.  We must think critically about the role of testing in responsible breeding, and learn how to weigh the value of a given test by its importance.

Also, we should not loose sight of the factors that are extremely important, but less amenable to simple genetic tests. This includes the temperament factors that define the breed, and the history of health and disease in the bloodlines of an individual dog.

Commercial genetics is now going for the low hanging fruit. In time, the science will improve on its ability to understand and predict the complex inheritance of immune system capabilities, bone structure, and temperament. When the science matures and the commercial products address our primary concerns, we should take it seriously.  Until then, much of it is a distraction, and we need to get better at weighing test results by their importance to the whole dog.

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30 minutes ago, sandgrubber said:

I recently posted this to a Labrador site, but it applies to all breeds.  The point is not to skip testing, but to be sure to look at the whole dog. 

 

A PLEA REGARDING TESTING

I've retired from both uni teaching and Labrador breeding.  One insight from teaching side is that it's tempting to test for what is easy to test, as opposed to what is important.

In the case of health testing, big pharma tends to offer a suite of genetic indicators that are easy for laboratories to find, as opposed to those that are important for health.  Narcolepsy and centronuclear myopathy are so rare I've never seen or heard of them apart from genetic testing websites.  On the other hand, cancer kills more Labs than any other disease, diabetes, epilepsy, and allergies are far too common. Bloat is relatively uncommon, given that Labs are deep chested and notorious gutsers, and I hope that it remains uncommon.  Likewise, it would be great if geneticists could get a handle on the genetic components of osteoarthritis, dysplasia, etc., so we could better separate genetics from environment.

Temperament is a whole nother can of worms.  Here it's sufficient to say that it has a strong genetic component, and as an owner I'd rather have a dog that goes blind in late middle age than one that is absurdly anxious or aggressive throughout its life. 

Testing is needed to preserve quality.  But if we test only for the menu big pharma is offering, we may end up throwing the baby out with the bath.  We must think critically about the role of testing in responsible breeding, and learn how to weigh the value of a given test by its importance.

Also, we should not loose sight of the factors that are extremely important, but less amenable to simple genetic tests. This includes the temperament factors that define the breed, and the history of health and disease in the bloodlines of an individual dog.

Commercial genetics is now going for the low hanging fruit. In time, the science will improve on its ability to understand and predict the complex inheritance of immune system capabilities, bone structure, and temperament. When the science matures and the commercial products address our primary concerns, we should take it seriously.  Until then, much of it is a distraction, and we need to get better at weighing test results by their importance to the whole dog.

This is a very interesting and good read. Thank you for this. 

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Tassie   
19 hours ago, JacobScollies said:

I am looking at the Australian Kelpie, Akita, or Cavalier King!

 

 

That's quite a range of hugely different breeds,    But anyway .... I know of no resource which would cover all breeds.   Your go to source of information for particular breeds would usually be breed clubs, and long established and respected breeders will sometimes have comprehensive information on their websites.

Be aware that it is a changing landscape too .. as new genetic tests are developed .. some important, some not so much, as @sandgrubber has pointed out.   And there are tests which while the results can be indicative, they are not definitive.   I'm thinking of polygenetic and multi causal issues like joint problems .. hip dysplasia in particular.  (In such cases, breeders whom I respect will also be paying attention to familial lines, and the incidence of problems in particular lines they may be considering using.   

 

I would be taking each of those breeds and finding some good sources of information on the particular breed.

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In the United States, AKC breed clubs and the Orthopaedic Foundation for Animals have collaborated to develop lists of recommended tests for many breeds. Adherence to these requirements is regarded as fundamental to ethical breeding over there.

https://www.ofa.org/browse-by-breed

 

In Australia, I’d only use this list as a guideline, and check with local breed clubs. Australian breeders may not be required to do the same testing - sometimes for good reasons. There are population differences, including health differences, between countries in the characteristics of various breeds. Also, some specialist testing may be less available in Australia. I’m not sure how many board certified veterinary cardiologists there are in Australia, for example.

 

Incidentally, you may find this register interesting. It lists hip and elbow scores by pedigree name for many Australian dogs. However, dogs can have superb hip and elbow scores and not be listed on Orchid, so ask the breeder if the puppy’s parent’s have been scored and make sure to view the hip and elbow report(s).

http://orchid.ankc.org.au/Home/SearchResults

 

 

Edited by DogsAndTheMob
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asal   
On 30/06/2020 at 5:29 PM, JacobScollies said:

I am looking at the Australian Kelpie, Akita, or Cavalier King!

 

 

big diversity in temperament there, all right  ,

 

Kelpie, intensely loyal, loving, higly trainable, workaholic,   "Quick and agile, Kelpie's are great dogs for families that love to work out. ... Kelpie's are obedient and easy to train , not to mention very intelligent and they will quickly learn new tricks and commands. A Kelpie  will stop growing around 12 months old."

 

 

Dont have any experience with an Akita. but heard they can be a challenge to train.

Akita "Temperament: Alert and responsive, dignified and courageous. Akitas may be intolerant of other dogs, particularly of the same sex"  "Training can be a challenge, for the Akita Inu is assertive, strong-willed, and bores easily. He may use his intelligence in ways that suit his own purposes. Yet owners who know how to lead will find him eminently trainable via praise and reward methods."

 

 

Cavalier King Charles. loving, eager to please lounge lizard. "The Cavalier King Charles is a sweet  and loving little dog who is highly trainable. Learn how to start their training on the right paw. ... These small companion dogs are highly trainable, and dogs learn most easily  during their early months of life."  although some will try the roll over. look cute and want to be picked up instead. and you end up trained.

 

Good luck making a decision

 

huge diversity in health parameters too.

Edited by asal
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asal   

mind if you are very active a cavi will stay with you, just not as fast as the other two breeds

 

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I have two Cavaliers.  One is a lounge lizard and the other is a fire cracker!  She's smart (too smart for me lol), very fast and very active.  If you're after an active Cavalier then you need to let the breeder know.  There are quite a lot of active Cavaliers around now and a good breeder should be able to link you up with the right pup, if that's what you're after.  The NSW Cavalier Club has a website with all the health related information on it.

 

Kelpies are a great dog but very very active!  They need a lot of mental stimulation as well.

 

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