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Domandal

My Lab Bit Me.

159 posts in this topic

should I change my behaviour towards her this morning to let her know I'm disappointed or is that a waste of time.

No.

She will have no idea why things have changed.

pls make that phone call this morning .... :)

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Domandal   
should I change my behaviour towards her this morning to let her know I'm disappointed or is that a waste of time.

No.

She will have no idea why things have changed.

pls make that phone call this morning .... :)

Will do, thanks again

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Tazar   

Don't change your behaviour, she will have no idea why you are acting differently, unless you can catch or mark a behaviour within a second and a half it is totally pointless.

Just avoid those situations, car & bed, where you have had grizzles.....

Keep us posted on how you go too :)

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..Yes, don't discount anything at this stage ..

Yes, there could well be a training/communication problem

Yes, there could be a pain problem...

Best to investigate everything , so you can then work on the precise problem :)

many years ago we had a rottie pup who bit when picked up ..training didn't help. She was active and happy otherwise .

Xrays showed Hip dysplasia and an improperly healed shoulder fracture .

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Luke GSP   

Thanks for the responses will definitely seek out some help, it's funny before this morning I thought we had done a reasonable job training Layla, she wasn't perfect but she was manageable. Looks like I have to get a doctors appointment too, that wasn't on my list of things to do today!

I'm also wondering as Layla is giving us the morning yelp from the laundry to let her out for a pee, this is routine, should I change my behaviour towards her this morning to let her know I'm disappointed or is that a waste of time.

Don't change or try and change any behaviour until you have spoken to the behaviourist, been assessed and recommendations made and put in to place. I would however be making sure that the bedroom was out of access (door shut) for the time being.

Vet check as well, as previously recommended by others

Edited by Luke GSP

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Weasels   

Wow, we're still talking about pack hierarchies in 2012? On a dog forum? :(

in the meantime I would at least stop trying to use physical manipulation with her as that is what seems to be causing the problem.

Please don't tell your dog off for growling, that's her way of communicating with you and when she growls that is her warning to you. It's basically me skipping the stop it I don't like it part and punching you instead. It's not fair to take away her means of communication because you think it's not acceptable, you need to address the issue that is making her growl and fix that for the growling to stop.

Agree and agree. Using a slip lead to get her off the bed is a safer option. Teaching an "off" command even more so.

I'm in Northern suburbs of Perth, mixeduppup.

Excellent behavioural trainers in the Norther Suburbs are K9 Positive Works

http://www.facebook.com/K9PositiveWorks

Or Paw Prints Pet Training

http://pawprintspettraining.com.au/

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I'm sure Kathy will get you back on track with your Lab. It's amazing how much you can (all) learn from a good behaviorist.

Hope your hand isn't too sore, but good idea to get you both checked out by professionals, pity you can't get a 2 for 1 deal at the vet. :laugh:

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Kadbury   

:D

That actually happened to me at a ve when I was bitten by a very sick little kitten (rescue with cat flu) The Vet put the kitten down took me to the Table and scrubbed the bite with anteseptic and covered the wounds......I thought it was funny at the time until I learnt that Cat/Dog/Human bites can be very serious.

I'm sure Kathy will get you back on track with your Lab. It's amazing how much you can (all) learn from a good behaviorist.

Hope your hand isn't too sore, but good idea to get you both checked out by professionals, pity you can't get a 2 for 1 deal at the vet. :laugh:

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Zug Zug   

Aww she looks lovely!

Stay positive. It is just behaviour - you can sort it out. Very glad you weren't badly hurt.

Agree with all the advice and also agree that you should not let her in the bedroom, at least until you've had your first visit with a behaviourist. The bed issue may be a bit loaded - she needs to sleep elsewhere.

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Guest Willow   
Guest Willow

Another recommendation for Kathy Kopelis McLeod here

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Maybe she is sore? It seems to only be when you pick her up or 'shove' her. I have a dog who would bite me if I 'shoved' her. Heck, I would bite if someone shoved me.

I'd be straight to the vet before anything else.

She hasn't shown any signs of pain and moves freely during swimming and running at the beach yesterday, but I will get her checked out.

This was my first thought, and sorry but growling is a sign of pain, you might not see it in her movement because they can adjust their movements to avoid pain over time meaning you may not notice. As everyone has said

1. Call the recommended behaviourist, tell her you've been bitten

2. Take Layla to a vet for a full check

3. Go to the doctor to check your hand

Good luck :)

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Wow, we're still talking about pack hierarchies in 2012? On a dog forum? :(

Why not? With some dogs it is a very relevant issue. For most dogs it isn't an issue and sticking to all the old rules are a waste of time but in some situations re-establishing the family pack has to be done for everyone's safety. The issue I see here with the frequently absent female owner is that the dog has become "daddy's girl" and resents being pushed from that position. Just as male dogs frequently bond like this with female owners, female dogs do it with male owners. Some dogs are also one person dogs, refuse to take orders from anyone else and can get quite stroppy about it if you push them.

To the OP. Definitely try to get hold of the book "Think Dog" by John Fisher to understand what has gone wrong here but in the mean time get a good professional in to help you and get the dog off the bed permanently. Do not physically challenge this dog or things could really escalate.

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BC Crazy   

I have just started reading "Think Dog", really enjoying it. Puts a whole different spin on how we view the interaction between dogs & humans. Also helps you read their body language. Very interesting thus far.

It will help you understand why the 'dog on the bed' means so much more to them, the message it's sending them, than it does to us in some dogs.

Edited by BC Crazy

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One of my own dogs tried to bite me recently, out of the blue. I was only stroking him on his head where I normally do. This was out of character but recently he has started showing signs of dementia. I took him straight to the vet - he had an ear infection. Def. get checked for other pains she may have.

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Tazar   

I have just started reading "Think Dog", really enjoying it. Puts a whole different spin on how we view the interaction between dogs & humans. Also helps you read their body language. Very interesting thus far.It will help you understand why the 'dog on the bed' means so much more to them, the message it's sending them, than it does to us in some dogs.

Good read that one :thumbsup:

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I have just started reading "Think Dog", really enjoying it. Puts a whole different spin on how we view the interaction between dogs & humans. Also helps you read their body language. Very interesting thus far.

It will help you understand why the 'dog on the bed' means so much more to them, the message it's sending them, than it does to us in some dogs.

This book changed my life. I know the "pack heirachy" thinking is now considered old school but the methods used to overcome problems are mostly positive and that is where this book is at opposites to the old methods of Kohler, Barbara Woodhouse and Ceasar Milan. The other books by John Fisher are also worth reading as well.

I remember ready a Barbara Woodhouse book where she dealt with a little dog with the same problem of the dog not wanting the wife to get into bed. Her method was to don a very heavy coat and leather gloves and remove the snarling dog from the bed. Hardly something you could do with a large dog though. I much prefer John Fisher's non confrontational methods that are so much safer and still get results.

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