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Lulu

Hermaphrodite pug puppy

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Lulu   

Hi. My 6mth old female pug has been diagnosed as a hermaphrodite. She is to undergo surgery next week to remove the penis protruding from her girlie bits. The op will cost $3000 but is necessary for her health and well-being. Has anyone else gone through this and has their dog recovered ok in the long term?

 

I did buy from a top breeder interstate at considerable cost and have been told to return my 6mth old pup for a replacement - they are not interested in refunding part of the purchase price to help subsidise the pending vet bill. Bit hard to return her when the pup has bonded with the family and likely she will be put down, don’t you think?

 

Edited by Lulu
Grammar

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RuralPug   

This can happen in absolutely any breed of dog, and is just basically bad luck. The cases I have been aware of (one in your breed, all of the others in different breeds) have all led problem free lives after surgery. The surgery will vary from case to case, but that is the highest surgery quote I have heard of - you might want to get a few more quotes from different vets.
There is, as far as I know, absolutely zero way to predict when a hermaphrodite is going to pop up, it is especially hard when the extra genital bits don't appear until the dog is five or six months old.
It actually isn't the breeder's fault, from what I've seen. If the breeder has kept the puppy for themselves (and I know of at least one case where that has happened) they would just have to suck it up.
Not all congenital conditions are due to hereditary problems - and the breeder has offered you a replacement pup, which I would consider very generous of them, personally.
If you accept the replacement pup, you can't keep the first one. That is your decision to make. And what  basis do you have to assume that the breeder would put the pup down?

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Rebanne   

This falls into the sh!t happens category. Mother Nature does like to play tricks on us. No way the breeder could have predicted this happening. I've known of only one dog who was a hermaphrodite, she had the op and all was well. I agree with RuralPug, the price seems very high. Get a couple more quotes.

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Mjosa   

About ten years ago a friend of mine bought a Pug from a top breeder in Victoria, all was going well and when she was about five or six months old she was also diagnosed with this problem, the breeder offered her a replacement pup which she decided to take, sent the other little girl back to the breeder and she was never put down, had the op done and now an old girl and has had a great life in another pet home.

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If the surgery is necessary (if it’s causing her issues) and you can’t afford it/aren’t willing to pay, perhaps chat with the breeder. They may be able to swap her with another puppy and keep her for themselves & pay for the surgery, or find her another home that can. 

Best of luck! 

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Jumabaar   

I am guessing you have been referred to a specialist or a vet with experience with this surgery. It isn't quite a routine surgery so shopping around wouldn't be my recommendation. 

 

I have heard of many successful surgeries. 

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Dogsfevr   

People can have the same issue ,its a shit happens thing,Breeders can't be blamed for every issue & when you take on any animal there are vet bills,if you have insurance no drama but the breeder has offered you something .

Honestly it peeves me off when people say if i return it it will be PTS seriously the breeder most likely wont & would just do the surgery .

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2 hours ago, Dogsfevr said:

People can have the same issue ,its a shit happens thing,Breeders can't be blamed for every issue

Yes

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Hmm I have to disagree with others.

 

Of course the breeder couldn’t control the puppy’s health and gender, but it’s a pretty big problem, especially a problem that will cost $3000 to fix! They should take some responsibility and at least help a bit with vet bills - especially since it's 6 months after purchase. Shouldn’t they also be concerned with the life of the puppy they bred?

 

And how could puppy part from family after 6 months of bonding? Pretty harsh of breeder. It’s a PUPPY, not a faulty CAR or object.

 

Good of you to pay for top surgery, you obviously love your puppy.

 

I hope she is OK and it all works out :(

Edited by doglover28

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Dogsfevr   
3 hours ago, doglover28 said:

 

And how could puppy part from family after 6 months of bonding? Pretty harsh of breeder. It’s a PUPPY, not a faulty CAR or object

That isn't how it works in the fair trading ,obviously cases may vary for some reasons but its treated like a "goods" ,the breeder has offered a legit resolve.
Also there may be parts of this story missing .

Some breeders may ask for a second opinion or if looking at assisting the bill seek a second opinion on the procedure & cost ..

This is such a rare issue ,just like humans although im sure parents don't expect someone to pay for there creation.?

 

I know of one person with an Am Staff that had an issue,had surgery no issues at all.Generally done when there getting spayed,i believe some cases can be less/ more  invasive as others but a good success rate .

But in the end this is not a problem any breeder can for see or test for so yes it is a deal with it issue  ,a very rare occurring issue 

 

 

Edited by Dogsfevr
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Lulu   

Lulu had her surgery today. It was a very long procedure and the surgeon highly experienced. He rang me twice -once to advise they had found substantial male and female parts, that her uretha was through the male part, and X-rays showed penis bones too, and then afterwards to let me know she was ok. I’m glad we went to such an experienced surgeon because it was highly intricate and they had all the machines on hand. She’s in animal hospital tonight - they texted me a picture of her to let me know she’s ok. 

Thanks for the comments. Fingers crossed for next couple days that complications don’t set in but she should be right now. 

A201E40C-4D82-4260-A5A5-847CBB038D16.jpeg

Edited by Lulu
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Rebanne   

Gorgeous girl. Hope it's smooth sailing from now on

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juice   

just a side question, if they have both bits how do you decide which way to go?

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1 hour ago, juice said:

just a side question, if they have both bits how do you decide which way to go?

I would guess the most functional/real part? I.e. if the penis works and that’s how pup wees then that, but if the vulva works and she pees like that then keep that?

I’m pretty sure they can just have “pseudo” bits, that are just tissue but don’t have a function. :shrug:

I’ve seen a surgery of a male dog who must’ve got glass stuck up in his penis when it retracted back in and it kept bleeding & getting cut up, the rescue realised he had something sharp in his bits.:scared:  So they had to amputate the penis & “turn him into a girl” ie make a false vulva so he could urinate from there. (From memory) 

 

 

Ps sorry Lulu for going off topic! :offtopic:<— me 

Edited by Scrappi&Monty

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You can replace a dog, but you can’t replace a life.

If the family are willing to keep the puppy and get her fixed at an expensive cost then the breeder should be thankful. Wouldn’t it cost her more to give away another puppy than make a contribution to the surgery?

I think that if a puppy has these problems within the first 6 months of her life, and the new family did not know when they bought the puppy, the breeder has an obligation to contribute financially. Not ask the family to make a painful separation by swapping dogs!

Bad service. Morally wrong. Step up!

Edited by doglover28
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Mjosa   

The breeder offered the OP another puppy which most reputable breeders do and to take that poor little soul back, if some health problems arise that could be expensive to correct, definitely not morally wrong on behalf of the breeder.

This condition is not usually noticed in a very young puppy, 8 weeks, but it does become apparent when they are around six months old.

Of course the sweet little thing has had corrective surgery and now hopefully she will have a full healthy life as with the puppy my friend had with the same problem.

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juice   

Agreed, however the breeder would have to pay for the surgery if they took the pup back and swapped it for another pup so why not pay towards it now?

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That ‘thanks’ is more a ‘thankful’. :heart:

 

... that you gave your pug puppy the specialist care she needed, it did indeed sound like a very complicated surgery!

 

... that the surgeon and animal hospital provided and is providing such quality care. :)

 

... and that we finally got a photo! :laugh:

 

Wishing her a swift recovery.

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