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Selecting a Dog Breed


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If the dog is going to be on it's own 5 days a week from 8 - 5.30 then I think it's a bit mean to then make it also sleep outside at night. In the winter it will be lucky to see you beyond being fed. I don't have a problem with dogs sleeping outside in general but only if they have plenty of time with their owners hanging out and doing stuff. I do agree with it not being locked in the house while you are at work, besides the toileting issue it's pretty boring being in an empty house.

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Which breeds attract you generally ? Do you like fluff, or huge, or stocky, or working , or racing sleek ?  night time is when there are odd noises/stray cats /possums etc around , and pup/dog lear

Hi Jessica,  I’m not too sure what ‘most people’ even means. Do you mean common breeds??? Also ‘brave enough’ and pitbull don’t ever need to go together in a sentence. Pitbulls, just as

Limited choices if you want it to sleep outside ,Companion breeds are exactly that thrive on human comapny ,people can certainly work but want there humans when you get home . Is there a reason it m

1 hour ago, RuralPug said:

Yes there are quite a few reputable rescues in Vic - let us know what general area you are in and we can recommend some. One that springs straight to mind as a good ethical rescue that covers most of Vic and is careful in rehabilitating dogs and then matching them to adoptive homes is Victorian Dog Rescue - they have a web page and a facebook page.

The reason that I don't recommend a pound or shelter in your instance is due to you needing a low activity dog that is content to spend several hours a day alone. What you don't need is a dog that is going to need a lot of man hours of rehabilitation because it is bored and destructive or constantly escaping or howling etc.
Pounds and shelters are simply not in a position to assess dogs to see if they match criteria - the dogs are all kennelled with other dogs and people nearby during the day. Pounds in particular very rarely try to match dogs with homes and simply sell to who ever is first in line and willing to pay. That is fine for those who can accept the work that might be required if the dog doesn't match their criteria. Some shelters are a bit more discriminating but again cannot assess due to kenneling.

Yeah, I'm in the Brighton area but I'm willing to drive for up to 1.5 hours to find my perfect buddy

Thanks for your efforts!

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1 hour ago, Rebanne said:

If the dog is going to be on it's own 5 days a week from 8 - 5.30 then I think it's a bit mean to then make it also sleep outside at night. In the winter it will be lucky to see you beyond being fed. I don't have a problem with dogs sleeping outside in general but only if they have plenty of time with their owners hanging out and doing stuff. I do agree with it not being locked in the house while you are at work, besides the toileting issue it's pretty boring being in an empty house.

Plenty of ways to avoid boredom though, the inside of a house is no less stimulating than sitting alone in a yard.

Personally, I see a lot of advantages to keeping dogs inside if you aren't home. Firstly, they're so much safer- almost no chance of them escaping or being stolen, no chance of baiting, less issues with barking, no need to worry about the weather, etc.

As for toileting.. we trained our whippets to use Conni pads. Very easy and especially useful in wet weather when dogs aren't keen on going outside.

Provide a rotation of good toys, access to comfy places to sleep and my dogs are very happy creatures.It's absolutely doable, if you're willing to make a few small changes to your day.

And as an added advantage, because they're inside dogs, they're very clean, which means they're that much more pleasant to be around. At one stage, I had four inside dogs (three greyhounds and a whippet) and my house smelled perfectly fine, according to visitors who could be relied on to be honest with me (my mum :laugh:)

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12 hours ago, Maddy said:

Plenty of ways to avoid boredom though, the inside of a house is no less stimulating than sitting alone in a yard.

Personally, I see a lot of advantages to keeping dogs inside if you aren't home. Firstly, they're so much safer- almost no chance of them escaping or being stolen, no chance of baiting, less issues with barking, no need to worry about the weather, etc.

As for toileting.. we trained our whippets to use Conni pads. Very easy and especially useful in wet weather when dogs aren't keen on going outside.

Provide a rotation of good toys, access to comfy places to sleep and my dogs are very happy creatures.It's absolutely doable, if you're willing to make a few small changes to your day.

And as an added advantage, because they're inside dogs, they're very clean, which means they're that much more pleasant to be around. At one stage, I had four inside dogs (three greyhounds and a whippet) and my house smelled perfectly fine, according to visitors who could be relied on to be honest with me (my mum :laugh:)

Do you mind telling me more about Connie pads? And how to use them ect.

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I know you want a small dog but perhaps look into Greyhounds as they may suit your situation too.

Also consider adopting a pair of small dogs so that they have company when you are not home.

Some rescues have two dogs who are needing to be homed together and cannot be apart from each other.

Our neighbours have two small dogs who are inside when they are at work but also have a dog door so they can go outside if they want.

Also a cat may suit as well;most cats will sleep a lot in the day and enjoy a couch cuddle and play when you get home.

 

 

http://gap.grv.org.au/adopt-a-greyhound/

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7 hours ago, Purdie said:

I know you want a small dog but perhaps look into Greyhounds as they may suit your situation too.

Also consider adopting a pair of small dogs so that they have company when you are not home.

Some rescues have two dogs who are needing to be homed together and cannot be apart from each other.

Our neighbours have two small dogs who are inside when they are at work but also have a dog door so they can go outside if they want.

Also a cat may suit as well;most cats will sleep a lot in the day and enjoy a couch cuddle and play when you get home.

 

 

http://gap.grv.org.au/adopt-a-greyhound/

A greyhound locked outside all day and night will not be a happy dog. Personally, I wouldn't rehome a greyhound to a home where it was going to sit outside by itself for the majority of its life- we're talking about a breed of dog that usually lives around at least several others of its kind while racing, they are rarely happy living in almost complete isolation. In my honest opinion, this is another thread where the most suitable dog for the OP might just be a cat.

Also, the OP mentions never having owned a dog and again, I know greys get recommended a lot as "easy" first dogs, but they're very different from the average dog and in my opinion, not ideal for the first-time dog owner unless the prospective owner has done a hell of a lot of research and understands what they're getting.

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Perhaps OP can go with one of the "foster with a view to adopt" programs? This way can trial a few dogs in the home environment, and if one clicks then that is the one you adopt. But in the meantime, helping getting a dog out of the pound environment and assessing it for home living.

 

Victorian Dog Rescue does these, I think the Save A Dog scheme and Animal Aid do as well.

Some rescues did not like I work long hours, but others did because it meant I had a low key quiet household for the nervous one to settle in. All a matter of the individual dog and working with them :)

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Hello ZestyLemon, considering you have yet to own a dog, I believe you will warm up to the idea of letting your companion sleep indoors. Dogs have a way of getting what they want, weaseling their way into our hearts and our beds :rofl: 

Also if you are looking for a ‘buddy to cuddle’ up to I would recommend a foster Staffy - in the age group of 3years and upwards. If you look around the many rescue organisations you may even be able to meet and have a trial in your home to see if a Staffy is for you. 

 

Lots of staffys get overlooked in pounds especially brindles. Be sure to ask lots of questions and find out the ‘energy and excersize’ requirements of the individual dog :)

 

Also are you interested in male or female? Be sure to find out as much as possible about the dog that is in foster care, re: temperament, bad habits, training, good on lead or off lead, social with others etc. 

 

all the best with your search 

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10 hours ago, Jessica Parker said:

It all depends on your choice, which one you most like even in pics. Most people go for german shepherd, labrador or if you're brave enough then you also go for Pitbull.

Hi Jessica, 

I’m not too sure what ‘most people’ even means. Do you mean common breeds???

Also ‘brave enough’ and pitbull don’t ever need to go together in a sentence.

Pitbulls, just as other breeds have individual needs and requirements. You don’t need to be brave at all. Sounds very arrogant. 

 

Some might say that I’m brave having a chihuahua” ... 

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2 hours ago, PeiLuvR said:

Hi Jessica, 

I’m not too sure what ‘most people’ even means. Do you mean common breeds???

Also ‘brave enough’ and pitbull don’t ever need to go together in a sentence.

Pitbulls, just as other breeds have individual needs and requirements. You don’t need to be brave at all. Sounds very arrogant. 

 

Some might say that I’m brave having a chihuahua” ... 

You do need to be brave, no because of the dog, but because of laws and attitudes.  No, make that 'stupid'.  Getting a banned or restricted breed is NOT a good entrée into dog ownership. 

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19 hours ago, Jessica Parker said:

It all depends on your choice, which one you most like even in pics. Most people go for german shepherd, labrador or if you're brave enough then you also go for Pitbull.

On what planet do 'most people ' go for pitbulls?? They're a restricted breed! I can count on one hand the number I have met in all my years of dog ownership. Far from being a common pet and most certainly NOT a breed for a novice owner. 

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Hold up people. Think the lines have gotten crossed. Can I just state right now, that l never recommended a Pitbull to ZestyLemon. I said there are so many staffys In pounds requiring rescue and that they are great companions for  cuddling / couch / bed buddies. 

 

I dont like the accusatory tone that I ever said pitbulls are not restricted... And I certainly wouldn’t advise one for a first time dog owner. That’s plain stupid. 

 

Im brave to own a chihuahua.

I’m brave to own Shar Pei 

I’m brave to foster and rescue toy poodles 

 

And having owned a pitbull in the past, I didn’t need to be brave just kind and loving and devoted to him! 

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Hello!

I'd like to get a Border Collie. I've been thinking about it for a while now and I'd just like to run some things by people who have experience with them to get some feedback first. I want to be prepared etc. 

Is a Border Collie right for me?

I live in the suburbs my yard is quite "average" in size, but by no means is it tiny or anything. I jog in a large park every day for at least 1.5 hours (usually more) and I'd love a jogging partner. I'm home most of the day as I do part time study and I'm working on setting up my own business. I'm actually studying animal behaviour and I will soon offer my own training services (I love training dogs). I owned, in the past, a Shetland Sheepdog and I used to take him everywhere with me, we'd jog together etc. If I were to own a Border Collie, I would dedicate hours to training, and exercise everyday. I'd also want to take him/her everywhere with me (when ppossible). In the near future I'd also like to do hiking and bush walking as well, would a Border Collie enjoy this type of thing? I'd also like a dog that could participate in agility and other kinds of events like that. I don't know what else I could say that's relevant at the moment?

 

Any tips on what it's like to own one?

Are Border Collies generally playful? Affectionate? 

 

Thanks guys!

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Hi Melert, yes you sound like an ideal owner for a full on working breed like a Border Collie - also consider Kelpies, Koolies, Belgian Shepherds and working line GSDs. Owning a working breed is a very fulfilling thing, you need to put a fair amount of effort in , but the rewards are huge and satisfying. Owning a working breed without putting in very much effort is, however, very frustrating for both dog and owner.
Do remember that high impact repetitive activity like jogging and jumping is not good for a puppy's growing bones and ligaments, so no jogging until adult growth has been reached then start slowly and work up.
You ask if BCs like bushwalking etc - quite simply, they LOVE any activity that keeps them with their human, so yes! 
All breeds of dog are playful and affectionate with their own humans, BCs and other working breeds are no exception to this. Many of the working breeds enjoy playing with any human at all, especially if fetch is involved!

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OP, good on you for doing your research into appropriate breeds for your lifestyle :) part of the reason so many wind up at the “pounds” is because others buy without doing such prior thinking.

 

I have lived all my life with dogs; big, little, cross breeds, rehabilitated rescues, deaf dogs and pedigrees...all have been inside/outside, and all have preferred the outside. 

Which can feel a tad insulting when they choose their little building under the patio instead of coming in with me! :P

 

Whether a dog will be fine outside for long periods will depend very much on 

- climate - are you happy to be outside in at least part of your yard in (almost) all types of weather? (Things like snow change the game lol).

-yard set up - will the dog have an area that can be an equivalent of “inside”? Such as Access to an insulated & renovated shed (which you’re happy to store only chewable furniture in ;) )? 

- Are there enough shaded areas/sheltered areas/sunning points/lookout points etc...

-are you neighbors nice and not likely to pester your dog? 

- safety issues - Can you keep your yard clean enough to ensure vermin choose to live in your neighbor’s yard instead? 

 

 

If “yes” to the above, I personally have found that dogs (if their breeding is suited for it) will genuinely prefer you coming out with them instead of having to sit around inside watching you be boring lol. 

 

For a first time dog owner, I would actually say go with a puppy.

Rescuing requires at best a lot of flexibility on your behalf, as the poor dog has been at least socialised/raised differently to how you’d have liked, and at worst, needs a full time commitment to rehab a traumatised, starved dog who may have life long phobias which they are beyond being desensitised to. 

 

You mentioned that you have a large period of leave - if you are willing to spend even four weeks training and secretly/obsessively observing your dog (are they entertained whilst you’re “gone”? Do they know where their water is? Is it in a container they can’t knock over? Are they comfortable and confident? Can they reach that item you swore they couldn’t? Do they know that I leave yet always come back?) then I vote you will be fine :) it IS work on your behalf - those casual strolls outside have to be timed perfectly - but it makes for a happy and relaxed dog if you’re prepared to stress yourself out for a bit ;) 

 

As for actual breed, that honestly depends on your abilities and likes more than anjthing! :) if you’re at all timid about taking on dog raising,  I would be looking at a Lab or Goldy due to how easy they are to train and exercise, but mainly how gentle in nature they are - they’ll forgive you any mistakes far more easily than some other breeds might! 

Otherwise, I’d head to a Show to check out different breeds, or even ring vet practices for a chat. This will not only help you find out whether X breed is one you’re capable of feeding, treating etc but also give you a read on the person you’d like to be caring for your new addition :) 

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On 10/8/2018 at 1:26 PM, PeiLuvR said:

Hold up people. Think the lines have gotten crossed. Can I just state right now, that l never recommended a Pitbull to ZestyLemon. I said there are so many staffys In pounds requiring rescue and that they are great companions for  cuddling / couch / bed buddies. 

 

I don't think people were replying to you - Jessica Parker was the one saying 'most people go for GSDs, Labs, or Pitbulls if they're brave', disregarding the fact that none of these breeds would do well mostly outside, nor do they have minimal grooming needs.

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