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peter fenton

An aged fox hound

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Rocky is a 9 year old fox hound,resident for 2 years in the kennels at The Animal Welfare League set up at Kemps Creek.He has at most another 2 to 3 years to live but is yet to find a family with space in their heart and space in their home to adopt him.An earlier abuse victim,he is loyal,sweet tempered,independent spirited and loving.Who will give Rocky the best ending to his years in a loving,caring environment?

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tdierikx   

How in dog's name does anyone justify keeping any dog in kennels (shelter kennels at that!) for TWO YEARS!?!?!? If that was any other rescue organisation, the hordes would be baying for blood... grrr!

 

AWL should know better...

 

T.

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Scratch   
2 hours ago, tdierikx said:

How in dog's name does anyone justify keeping any dog in kennels (shelter kennels at that!) for TWO YEARS!?!?!? If that was any other rescue organisation, the hordes would be baying for blood... grrr!

 

AWL should know better...

 

T.

https://www.awlnsw.com.au/animals/59413/

 

Unfortunately it sounds like he may not be the easiest of dogs to place. I realise none of it is his fault.  

I worked with Fox Hounds years ago. I admire them a lot. I even dream of owning one. But they are not a simple breed to accommodate in a modern urban world. I hope the big guy can find a soft place to rest his old bones 

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He doesn't look like a pure Foxhound to me, more like a Bull Arab?  Definitely not going to be an easy placement, much harder when they can't go with other dogs and then they've got a massive bark if you go out.  Like finding a needle in a haystack sadly.

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On 9/29/2019 at 4:35 PM, tdierikx said:

How in dog's name does anyone justify keeping any dog in kennels (shelter kennels at that!) for TWO YEARS!?!?!? If that was any other rescue organisation, the hordes would be baying for blood... grrr!

 

AWL should know better...

 

T.

WELL,IF THE ALTERNATIVE IS EUTHANASIA ,WHICH OPTION DO YOU THINK BROCK WOULD CHOOSE?

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Snook   
1 hour ago, peter fenton said:

WELL,IF THE ALTERNATIVE IS EUTHANASIA ,WHICH OPTION DO YOU THINK BROCK WOULD CHOOSE?

To be honest, there are worse things than being dead. Two years in a kennel is an incredibly long time for a dog and can cause ongoing suffering and do untold damage to their mental health. I love my dog with all of my heart and would do anything for him but if it came down to it, I would rather euthanise him than let him suffer in kennels long term. He would be miserable and distressed. I strongly believe an animal's welfare and well being is infinitely more important than keeping them alive at any cost. I feel much the same way about humans too. 

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coogie   

If he came from a really bad situation he might be better off in the kennels if he is getting some attention, training and good food. 2 years does seem like a long time, but if they are working on his behaviour maybe he needed a few months and then he has been slow to be adopted. Genuine question, how long do those saying he should be pts think AWL should keep /work with a dog before making the call. If they see continuous improvement and the dog isn’t stressed or deteriorating at what point do people think they should euthanise him? A shelter near me has dogs that have been there for longer.I used to volunteer there, the dogs  got daily walks and lots of human interaction, they would try to find foster families for any dog that appeared to not be coping well with the shelter environment- and they worked tirelessly to find the right homes. I am not trying to start a ruckus, just interested in other opinions. I hope Rocky finds a good home very soon.

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tdierikx   
14 hours ago, peter fenton said:

WELL,IF THE ALTERNATIVE IS EUTHANASIA ,WHICH OPTION DO YOU THINK BROCK WOULD CHOOSE?

You'd be surprised mate... 2 years in kennels in a shelter environment - read constant stimulus of confused and unsettled dogs all around, a short walk maybe once a day if there are enough volunteer staff on to do the job - he's an old dog with other issues that make him less desirable to adopt...

 

Maybe you should adopt him then @peter fenton... or are his issues more than you can take on too?

 

How many other more adoptable dogs could have used that kennel over the past 2 years that didn't get the chance because Brock has been languishing there?

 

The simple fact is that we can't "save" them all... and some are actually better off at the Bridge, OK?

 

I worked in rescue (with kennels) for 7+ years, and we would have been crucified if we held dogs in those kennels for any extended period of time - the AWL/RSPCA would have been all over us for POCTAA breaches in that regard.... so what makes their shelter kennels any more suitable to house an old dog for 2 years?

 

T.

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AWL staff & vollies are looking at a healthy senior. They are humans too, like us. They think of him every day, feed him, walk him, play with him, give him treats, cuddle him, rug him up and pray for him. 

 

Rhetorically; Exactly what day would people choose for him to die? How do you decide he is unhappy/mentally broken? Will you pay him a visit to see for yourselves?

 

It's not an easy call and it has to be based on an individual dog's assessment. Dogs do become: institutionalised, some become fence fighters, self mutilators, antisocial, timid, aggressive, kennel crazy, any number of things. Others are really quite happy.

I'm not into kennelling long term either if anyone has read this far,  not to mention my dogs are small and older. But I also have the luxury of not having to take one of my rescues to be pts because it's taking up room that another, more adoptable dog could use. (Despite being told to by a few geniuses over the years)

 

There's privately owned dogs legally living their years in runs which we aren't allowed to talk about.

Edited by Powerlegs
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tdierikx   

Well met @Powerlegs... I value and respect your opinion as always...

 

The fact remains that AWL would have seized animals from our rescue if we'd had any in kennels for half of the time this old man has been in theirs... and the double standards are glaring...

 

There are reasons beyond his age that are stopping him from being adopted... but living out his final years in shelter kennels is not optimal for his health and wellbeing either.

 

https://www.awlnsw.com.au/animals/59413/

 

He needs to be an only pet (antisocial with other animals?), he barks when alone (separation anxiety?), needs great fencing to keep him contained, needs extensive retraining to be a house pet (will not be house/toilet trained)... and he's quite senior for his breed, which could mean a bunch of vet bills not far into the future...

 

I understand fully that after this length of time, shelter staff may have become attached to him, but that is no reason for him to languish in kennels for such an extended period - that alone will have lasting negative implications for his adoptability chances, and sometimes the hard decicions just have to be made. The longer he is in kennels, the more institutionalised he becomes, and thus also becomes less desirable to adopt. There are worse options than being given his wings with love and dignity...

 

T.

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I made the original post on behalf of Brock.I did seriously consider adopting him but I already have 2 rescued boys,a 14 year old husky and an 11 year old cattle cross.Animal Welfare league have enough kennels to give Brock a home without depriving other more adoptable dogs of shelter.He gets more than one walk a day,social interaction and excellent vet care.I rest my case which is he is better alive in his kennel because someone  could well turn up at any moment to give him a home.You would be surprised to know how many people respond positively to a dog like Brock with his several behavioural issues.They just haven't turned up yet/

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AVAILABLE FOR ADOPTION (still): Brock

On the 30th of October 2017, a male Foxhound was surrendered to our Inspectorate after it was found that his previous owner was not able to care for him due to illness.

Brock spent almost a year with our vets and behaviour teams - putting on weight, and learning how to be a very good boy.
After passing his medical and behavioural assessments, Brock was made available to adopt from Kemps Creek shelter on 8th October 2018. Fast forward a year later, and Brock is still available to adopt. Day after day, Brock waits and waits and waits...

10-year-old Brock is very special and needs a very special home. He needs a home where he will be treasured, where he won't share the spotlight with any other pets, and a place where his hound-like barking won't upset the neighbours!

If you would like more information on the longest-term pet we have at our shelter, please call us on 8777 4445 or email [email protected]

AWL NSW Rehoming Organisation Number: R251000222

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Diva   

I love foxhounds but even where I live rurally a baying hound would soon get me in bad trouble with the neighbours. 

Good luck old fellow. 

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tdierikx   

I know I would respond positively to Brock's various issues myself @peter fenton... but I've also worked in rescue for a number of years and know the realities. I'm certainly not in the position (or of the inclination) to adopt a dog like him, and I'm fairly experienced (read qualified) in animal care/husbandry (of many species). I personally don't think a dog with his issues will make a great family pet... and asking someone to step up and take him on knowing about those issues, the amount of work needed to rectify them, AND the fact that he is a senior dog with few years left in him... it's a bit of a stretch to say the least...

 

I have had previous experience with a foxhound we had in our rescue... it was bloody hard to find him a suitable home, and he was a young dog with very few issues. We had him in care for 3 months before that suitable home was found - even though we had many adoption requests for him. Foxhounds aren't usually suited to being suburban family pets.

 

@Powerlegs - he obviously hasn't passed all behavioural tests if he's not social with other animals... in fact, this actually makes him a liability - a large strong willed dog intent on not getting along with others is not a pleasure to walk, and he will need regular walks. His time in kennels will have seen any house/toilet training completely gone, he has a loud and annoying hound bark that he's likely to use if he's not got company at home, and I worry about the reference to him liking food a bit too much...

 

He may well be a lovely boy for shelter staff, but the reality is that he's a very poor adoption prospect... and I stand by my previous statement that there are worse things than being given his wings with love and dignity.

 

T.

 

 

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T I put him up so people can share him or not. Their choice.

I've also stated my opinion. I'm not the one calling the shots or having to rehome him.

I don't like the little jabs at rehoming senior dogs. And unless you can find it there's nothing in the CA Acts or POCTAA or DPI Code to say they would have seized any of your shelter dogs if they met the standards. 

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stellnme   

While I agree Brock has some challenges which would definitely be obstacles to anyone wanting to adopt him, there are many of us who like senior dogs with few years left in them :) - and often they surprise us with many extra, good years.  I hope there is someone out there who can meet his challenges. 

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tdierikx   
13 hours ago, Powerlegs said:

T I put him up so people can share him or not. Their choice.

I've also stated my opinion. I'm not the one calling the shots or having to rehome him.

I don't like the little jabs at rehoming senior dogs. And unless you can find it there's nothing in the CA Acts or POCTAA or DPI Code to say they would have seized any of your shelter dogs if they met the standards. 

Fair enough @Powerlegs...

 

For the record, I have nothing against rehoming senior dogs, and I admire and respect the work you do in that regard... but this particular dog has many other issues that make him much harder to rehome - PLUS the fact that he is older won't be going in his favour with the general public looking for a family pet...

 

And you know as well as I do that the ranger doing an inspection only has to 'form an opinion' that a particular animal needs to be siezed, and a large dog (especially a senior dog) in kennels for an extended period of time would definitely tick their boxes on that count, regardless of meeting the standards (which are in fact surprisingly low). The onus is then on the accused to prove otherwise in an expensive and lengthy legal process designed to work in the favour of the accusers. Been there, done that... and it's soul destroying...

 

I do hope Brock finds a new home soon... but at what point do you admit that it may never happen for him? 2 years in kennels? 3 years? 4? When they find that he's passed away overnight on his own?

 

T.

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Our gorgeous Brock has been at our shelter for two years!
That is way too long without a comfy lounge and Netflix!

So, we decided that our special boy will now enjoy the luxuries of a Foster Care home until an adoptive family comes forward.

Foster-Dad Russell came to pick up Brock yesterday and we've already received an update this morning that he was a very good boy (of course he was!).

Brock will celebrate his 10th birthday this Monday and we are so happy that he will get the spoils of a foster home on his special day.

Brock is still available to adopt, so please share Brock and help him find his new family! AWL NSW Rehoming Organisation Number: R251000222

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